Infographic – Pharma marketing to physicians

The vast majority of physicians today are digitally active, accessing multiple devices and networks as part of their day-to-day activities. Physicians are increasingly interested in video and social media for personal and professional use. These trends have numerous implications about what pharma cannot miss in creating its marketing plans.

  • According to recent studies 72% of physicians use social media sites for personal and professional reasons. Based on current trends 81% of doctors will own a smartphone by the end of 2012.
  • 73% of physicians use their smartphones to search content online while 55% of them use mobile apps.
  • 35% of physicians said they think tablets are a useful tool for pharma reps. According to their answers they find presentations a lot more effective when carried out with the help of a tablet device.
  • Online videos are also more and more popular among physicians. 82% of them prefer video content on WebMD while 50-50% of them watch videos on pharma websites and YouTube as well.

 

(Source: publicishealthware.com)

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Digital media and healthcare providers

There is a lot of data available on how physicians perceive and use digital technologies like the web or social media for finding health-related information. But how do their perceptions and use patterns compare to other providers like nurses and pharmacists? The infographic below analyses the question on hand.

According to a recent survey the same ratio of doctors, nurses and pharmacists (85%) turn to digital sources for healthcare information. There are definite differences tho when it comes to using mobile devices for gathering information.

An interesting finding of the survey is that physicians trust digital sources – websites, mobile sources and social media platforms – the most out of the three groups. Nurses and pharmacists see these as less reliable information sources.

According to the study 40-50% of the time physicians used digital tools for professional purposes while nurses turned to these more often for other reasons. Pharmacists turned to digital solutions for healthcare-related reasons the most.

 

(Source: Path of the Blue Eye)

Consumer use of social media in healthcare

Social media is becoming a bigger part of the collection of health information, but it varies by health condition and treatment options how patients use social channels during their online search. The more serious the condition, the more time patients spend online researching with social media tools as part of the equation.

This is one of the findings of a recent qualitative research project designed and carried out by Rich Meyer, an experienced DTC marketer working in the pharma industry for over 10 years now. The study showed other interesting trends about how consumers are using social media for seeking healthcare information and how it influences their decisions as well.

Here are the key findings of the research:

  • Seeking health information online is often triggered by health concerns of a patient or family member. People usually do not search for health-related information proactively. The search is initiated after experiencing the symptoms.
  • There is not one online source that is the most popular when it comes to searching for health info. There is no ultimate source. People in older age groups usually start with search engines, and often mention being overwhelmed by the sheer volume of health-related information online. One of the main problems for internet users is complexity, the often feel frustrated when not finding answers to more simple questions.
  • While some people use social media sites during their search, they rarely trust the accuracy of posts. The main reason to go to social media sources is to read about others’ experiences with the same health concerns. This is trend is more dominant with more serious conditions.
  • People are concerned about personal and data privacy, so they are usually not comfortable posting their medical information on social media sites. This was even a bigger of a concern for older demographics.
  • Before making a healthcare-related decision, women usually do more research online and go to a lot more websites than men.
  • While physicians are still a very important source of medical information, the need for a more cooperative approach to healthcare is obvious. Participants stated that they would like to discuss different options with their doctors.
  • Another interesting and possibly worrying aspect of the study is that during focus groups participants didn’t mention pharma company websites as a health-related online source at all. This might be due to the fact that they questioned the trustworthiness of pharma companies all together.

(Source: Pharmaphorum.com)

Why Dive Into Developing Mobile Health Apps?

While digital marketing solutions and social media projects became the center of attention in pharmaceutical communication recently, it is also important to notice the growing popularity of everything mobile. Below is a list of reasons why pharma companies should invest considerable time and energy into developing effective, creative health-related mobile applications.

The mobile trend is here to stay: Based on a recent study by Comp TIA, half of all physicians use smartphones for professional purposes and the use of mobile applications is steadily growing as well. According to another study, mobile technologies can be utilized especially in healthcare. There are many factors that influence mobile adoption on different markets. These factors include “consumer adoption, clinical adoption, evidence of efficacy, costs of deployment, and regulatory climate.”

High demand for healthcare and drug-related information online: Patients are looking to find valuable information about different treatment options, drugs and medical conditions online. According to a recent survey looking for health-related info online is the third most common activity of internet users. Maybe the biggest issue when it comes to treatments is medication adherence, which can be managed with easy-to-use, always available mobile devices in a very cost-effective way.

Mobile devices during clinical trials: A recent article emphasized the role mobile apps could play in the entire process of clinical trials. “The recruitment of patients, transmission of clinical trial records, and the reporting of adverse events in a prompt and accurate manner” can be all managed with creatively developed mobile applications.

Mobile apps can help communicate with HCPs more effectively: Tight budgets, digital solutions and the demand for time-efficacy resulted in big number of layoffs in the pharma industry with decreasing number of sales reps conducting in-person visits with physicians. “The significant decline of sales force presence has created an educational void for prescribers.” The need for a more effective educational method and better understanding between pharma and healthcare professionals could be managed with mobile apps created specifically for medical education and delivering prescriber information.

Information to bigger groups and institutions: With mobile applications it is easier to deliver a big amount of data to a wider audience in a manageable way. This is especially important when it comes to communicating with hospitals, healthcare organizations, patient or physician communities. Pharma can utilize this when providing information about products, treatments and different conditions.

(Source: The Digital Health Corner)

How Do We Spend Our Time Online?

A recent infographic from Go-Gulf presented striking numbers about just how much time people spend online. Social networking is the most popular activity by internet users while Google has the highest number of unique visitors monthly, followed close by Facebook. With 30 percent of the world’s population online the average time spent globally on the internet in one month only adds up to a mind-blowing 3,955,444 years.

According to the infographic below looking for health-related information online is the third most common activity among internet users. Only emailing and using search engines top its popularity. But looking for and finding valuable information can be two very different things. So do we trust online health info? Based on a new survey carried out by Wolters Kluwer Health people do trust the medical content they find on the internet. And this means a huge responsibility for every online publisher who create and distribute health-related information on the web. According the the survey:

65 percent of those seeking medical information online say they trust the information they find and 63 percent say they’ve never misdiagnosed themselves based on something they read online.

A recent post on KevinMD.com points out that Twitter can be a valuable medical resource for patients and their relatives as well. With many doctors, patient groups and health services providing help and information on the micro-blogging site, there is a pool of knowledge that could be tapped into after getting used to the idea of sharing and co-creating a knowledge base with only 140 characters at a time.

To think that only a decade ago we didn’t even have the term social networking, using Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites didn’t play any part in our everyday life. It’s safe to say that these fast paced changes in technology remodeled the way we look at medical information and diagnosing conditions entirely.

 

(Source: Mindjumpers.com, FierceHealthIT, KevinMD.com)

 

Advertising On Health Websites

Mayo Clinic’s recent decision to include paid advertisements on its website stirred up a heated debate. As the face of healthcare social media and effective patient education for a long time Mayo Clinic received a lot of criticism for its bold move to venture into the field of featuring ads next to important health-related issues.

I personally think in an economic climate like today’s no one can really argue with a financially smart decision if it is rightly done. Which means that in my opinion paid advertisements can have a place next to health information without taking away credibility and reliability. Unless they are placed poorly. And that is where Mayo Clinic made a mistake. Mark Schaefer, marketing consultant and author took to his blog to express his disbelief and disappointment about ads trying to sell children’s clothes next to an article about a condition during pregnancy that in most cases results in the death of the unborn child.

Here is a word I rarely use on my my blog: Stupid.  But I think it is an unavoidable description when an organization sells the soul of their brand for a few advertising dollars with a mindless strategy of advertising children’s clothes to women who have just lost their child.

I think the question is: was the placement of the ad intentional? I hardly think so. This is an organization that is involved in treating patients, conducting research, launching healthcare start-apps, using social media for better patient education and communication and operating a major platform for publishing reliable health-related content. I think by now they are aware of the sensitive nature of the different topics they are discussing.

I also think it is a case of not paying attention to detail and not making sure the content and the ads on the site are in sync. Placing ads can mean major funds for a website. Misplaced ads can mean angry and disappointed readers that have all the right to feel that way. And while a lot of times advertising agreements are a little loose when it comes to the content of the ads, a website specializing in healthcare content has to make sure to monitor and influence the ads appearing on the portal.

(Source: Businessgrow.com, Medcitynews.com)

Novo Nordisk Is The First In Pharma To Join Pinterest

It has been stated numerous times that the discussion about your brand is happening online whether you choose to take part in it or not. The latest social media sensation to prove this right is Pinterest. Launched February 2010, the number of users of the now popular image sharing site skyrocketed. Only two short years after its start, Pinterest had an amazing 11.1 million visitors just in February 2012, becoming the fastest website to have 10 million users.

With these numbers showing the enormous reach of the site it is surprising that pharma is just starting to think about jumping on the bandwagon. With so many new social applications and sites emerging one after the other it is understandable to wait and see if something is on the way to become the next best thing or if it just turns out to be a quickly fading trend. But a two-year waiting period is way too long by any measure. By now there are Pinterest users that claimed names of pharma companies on the site.

As John Mack (@pharmaguy) points out on his Pharma Marketing Blog, several companies are going to have some trouble claiming their own name on the photo sharing site. Among others, usernames like Boehringer, Roche, Merck and Novartis have been taken by other members of the site. And while they obviously have no intention to post content about these companies, using their names, connecting their brand with unrelated posts is hardly helping on any online platform. This can highly alter searches carried out by patients, clients influencing the companies’ content marketing strategies.

Novo Nordisk confirmed that it created a Pinterest profile for the company being the first one to do so in the pharma industry. And while the company hasn’t started pinning away yet, it already has an introduction uploaded on the site making the profile an official one. This way – even if only by dipping a toe into the water rather than jumping head first – Novo Nordisk reserved the right to control the content sent out in the name of its brand. With registering on Pinterest, the company has the opportunity to explore the options on the image sharing site and take its time to decide whether to utilize the possibilities of the platform or not. Bottom line is: while doing so, no one else is pinning unrelated content to their name.

While it seems that Novo Nordisk is still leaving most of its Pinterest page blank – other than the very important bio section mentioned before – Bayer started pinning under the name of “bayerus”. The company has 3 boards with 28 pins covering its business, and the subjects of sustainability and innovation. This shows that on the long run it’s not going to be about what username you pick, but rather how you can utilize the platform and find creative, effective ways to share content with your audience.

(Source: Pharma Marketing Blog, PMLiVE.com)

eMarketing Europe & Mobile 2012 Conference In Tweets

The 7th annual eMarketing Europe & Mobile 2012 conference organized by eyeforpharma drove a lot of attention to subjects like social media risk management, digital strategy building, regulatory issues and mobile devices in pharma. The discussions were lively and thought-provoking both at the conference and on Twitter under the #e4p hashtag.

Top tweets were published by @LionelREICHARDT, @jamesmusick and @KayWesley. Among the 2400 tweets shared throughout the event @whydotpharma, @gaborgy and @KayWesley were mentioned most frequently. Check out the analytics and the Twitter feed and share your thoughts about the conference.

(Source: Symplur.com)

The Shifting Business Model Of Pharma

A recent study carried out by Booz & Company and National Analysts Worldwide showed a lot of interesting data on how pharma executives see the industry, what they think are the most pressing challenges and how they are planning on changing their business according to the new economic environment.

They survey gathered answers from more than 150 pharmaceutical decision makers working in the US and Europe. Among the respondents were directors, vice presidents and managers. Their replies suggested something that is part of the pharma conversations for a long time now. Namely that the current model of doing business is not effective anymore and there is a significant need for transforming the industry.

Key findings:

  • 44% of respondents suggested that the pharma industry’s business model is not working, 24% strongly agreed with this notion. Only 6% disagreed.
  • When asked about the biggest challenges pharma is going to have to face in the coming years, 76% of respondents mentioned the pressure from cutting budgets and the rising price of healthcare. The second issue most decision makers (70%) were concerned about was delivering cost-effective solutions and demonstrating success in finding these alternative solutions. 60% of respondents said they fear the competition coming from generic products, while 53% finds less access to physicians a pressing issue. Interestingly with higher healthcare pricing being such a big concern, only 50% of respondents were worried about how patients are going to pay for their medications.
  • There is no agreement between decision makers about how these changes are going to effect the actual time that pharma representatives will spend with physicians. 43% of respondents said they believe face time with doctors will decrease, while 26% of executives thought the opposite.
  • According to the data gathered digital solutions are going to be the go-to sources to cut costs and to be more cost-effective. 58% of respondents plan on spending more on social media aimed at physicians, 55% are going to increase spending on mobile solutions while 52% of executives mentioned e-detailing as one of the main areas to focus on.

The shift from the old model of the pharma industry toward a digital, more social and interactive way to do business seems inevitable. The question remains how different companies are going to face the challenges of change and how effectively they can implement new solutions into their business.

(Source: Pharmalot.com)

The End Of Janssen’s Psoriasis 360 Facebook Page

Janssen has announced the closing of its Facebook page, called Psoriasis 360. The social campaign was known in the pharma sector as the go-to best practice example for successful and creative social media use. What the audience – and the rest of the industry for that matter – didn’t see tho, was the enormous amount of work that goes into moderating posts and comments on a platform like a Facebook page.

Janssen was the first to use “post-moderated comments”, meaning that these comments were only checked – and pulled if necessary – after they were posted. This was definitely a progressive way of handling comments on Facebook, something that became mandatory after new Facebook policies were introduced in August last year.

So does this mean that pharmaceutical companies don’t have a place on Facebook? Does this mean that monitoring is a daunting task that cannot be completed? I’m sure a lot of people in the pharma industry would say so and use the closing of Psoriasis 360 as a proof to their case. But is it fair to point fingers and use a previous best practice as a bad example, or even as an excuse to stay away from social media? Can an award-winning campaign become a “failure” overnight? I surely hope the answer is no. If anything people responsible for the campaign should be praised for not letting the situation get out of hand and for addressing difficulties on time.

The end of Psoriasis 360 should not serve as a bad example, but as a great one for the proper way to handle social media risks and still keeping the main goals of social engagement and patient education in the limelight. Janssen made its announcement available on the landing page of Psoriasis 360 where they inform their fans about the reasons behind their decision. But they go a little further too, they point the patients in the right direction to get information by mentioning the websites and Twitter accounts of the Psoriasis Association, the Psoriasis Scotland Arthritis Link Volunteers and the University of Manchester Skin Research as accurate and useful resources. The company also decided to take a little time before closing down the page entirely to make sure its message gets through to patients. If anything, this process should be a best practice example of how and when to end a social media campaign.

And before anyone accuses me of being too positive and forgiving, this event should also work as a catalyst to generate  more ideas to better manage the task of monitoring social platforms, the handling of comments coming from the audience and keeping alive successful campaigns while staying in line with regulations.

(Source: PMLiVE.com)